9 replies, 2 voices Last updated by dfhjr 6 months, 3 weeks ago
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    • #48390

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      The command prompt (cmd.exe) window will not stay open (regular / admin, same with powershell) following a recent Windows 10 update (correlation is not necessarily causation). It does work in Safe Mode.

      An inet search hasn’t turned up anything recent. I’ve tried turning off anti-virus, added WOW64 to path, but no success. No .bat files, no python consoles, … My ‘shutdown’ and ‘restart’ shortcuts still work.

      Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

      Take care, stay well,

      don

    • #48415

      TeamKomando:John
      Participant
      @264458

      Hello Don,

      Rather than trying to band-aid your current install of windows I recommend performing a refresh install of Windows 10, please be sure you have a backup of your data beforehand. Additionally, you will have two choices 1) Clean install (wipes all data) 2) refresh install (keeps your data and apps)

    • #48419

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      John,

      My concern is one of the most recent MS updates caused the problem. I can execute the command prompt in SAFE MODE, so I don’t think the system is corrupt. If I do a refresh, I suspect that same “feature” will still be there. Also, enough of the system is working that I don’t want to risk a full refresh that might put the rest of the system at risk.

      When this type of thing has happened in the past, MS has issued an ‘out of band’ fix the users with problems applied to fix the problem. I suspect an update screwed up the permissions for users on c:\windows\systemxxx as has happened in the past. I’m looking for that ‘rifle shot’ fix rather than apply the ‘shotgun’ immediately.

      Thanks for the suggestion.

      Take care, stay well,
      don

    • #48420

      TeamKomando:John
      Participant
      @264458

      Hello Don,

      Lets try try the rifle shot, boot into safe mode and run the following.

      Open command prompt and type “sfc /scannow” (without quotes) and hit enter.

      after, do this “chkdsk C: /f /r /v /b” In command prompt.

      If the “SFC / scannow” does find corruption and is unable to fix you will need to use DISM to repair it. You can click here to see how to use DISM.

    • #48421

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      John,

      I did the sfc command which found no errors and was planning to run dism next. I was delaying in the hopes of getting an “aim small, miss small rifle shot” either here or in the MS community. I have noticed that installers which put up command prompts seem to be running successfully, which support my permissions suspicion since they run as different roles. My user account is running as an admin because of some of the stuff I do.

      I will try chkdsk in between. I discovered I can run a number of commands from Windows+R bypassing the command prompt, so may try those commands via that method rather than going to SAFE MODE. Either way, I’ll delay those until my currently running back up is complete.

      Thanks for the exchange,
      don

    • #48422

      TeamKomando:John
      Participant
      @264458

      Don,

      I would like you to test something, try creating another user profile (admin user), and see if that works fine. I’m thinking you are right with the permissions issue, I wonder if your User profile or environment variables are corrupt.

      Before check disk I would also download HD tune, to make sure there is nothing wrong with the SSD / HDD. Once installed, open the app and click on health. If anything is yellow or red, you will need to replace your SSD/HDD.

      Glad to hear you have a backup in progress!

    • #48427

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      John,

      The other profile command prompt / powershell didn’t work either.

      I ran HDTune and looked at the Health tab. It appears it reads the disk statistics, correct? The only line that showed attention (blue/green) was CRC errors. All else was green-ok. The CRC number was consistent and stable. I ran the Dell Support assist Hardware analysis which includes Hard Disk analysis. It passed with no errors. After it ran, I again ran HDTune and the CRC values were the same as before.

      This still ‘feels’ like a permission mismatch. I run a number of pieces of software (e.g., amateur radio) that must be installed outside the ‘Program Files…’ directories to get around permission issues. Since things worked fine, Windows update, things don’t work fine but do in SAFE MODE (and for installers), I’m suspecting the update and looking for instances of commonality.

      I will try a less aggressive chkdsk first to see what’s detected and keep going forward. I’ll also run a boot time hardware diagnostic to see what it finds when I have the opportunity.

      Thanks for helping,
      don

    • #48433

      TeamKomando:John
      Participant
      @264458

      Hello dfhjr,

      With those CRC errors, you will want to run the aggressive chkdsk. I myself always replace disks with CRC errors. Additionally please take a look at this article here to get a better understanding of CRC errors.

    • #48436

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      John,

      I ran the full-up chkdsk. The results are below. After the chkdsk I ran hdtune again. The CRC numbers were unchanged. Depending on where the CRC is checked, the errors could be in the disk, the disk read logic, the cable and / or the PC disk interface hardware. Based on the bad sector count, I’m not too nervous about the disk at this time. From what I’ve heard, new disks at manufacture have bad sectors that are mapped around, and sectors will go bad as the disk ages. All disks will eventually fail.

      My next step will be the dism when I have some spare time to see if that will fix the problem. And I’ll keep my eyes open.

      Thanks for the help,
      don

      chkdsk results follow:

      Checking file system on C:
      The type of the file system is NTFS.

      A disk check has been scheduled.
      Windows will now check the disk.

      Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure …
      1145344 file records processed.
      File verification completed.
      Phase duration (File record verification): 1.54 minutes.
      16344 large file records processed.
      Phase duration (Orphan file record recovery): 0.00 milliseconds.
      0 bad file records processed.
      Phase duration (Bad file record checking): 0.83 milliseconds.

      Stage 2: Examining file name linkage …
      26592 reparse records processed.
      1450402 index entries processed.
      Index verification completed.
      Phase duration (Index verification): 4.77 minutes.
      0 unindexed files scanned.
      Phase duration (Orphan reconnection): 7.33 seconds.
      0 unindexed files recovered to lost and found.
      Phase duration (Orphan recovery to lost and found): 1.77 minutes.
      26592 reparse records processed.
      Phase duration (Reparse point and Object ID verification): 64.93 milliseconds.

      Stage 3: Examining security descriptors …
      Cleaning up 1449 unused index entries from index $SII of file 0x9.
      Cleaning up 1449 unused index entries from index $SDH of file 0x9.
      Cleaning up 1449 unused security descriptors.
      Security descriptor verification completed.
      Phase duration (Security descriptor verification): 323.02 milliseconds.
      152530 data files processed.
      Phase duration (Data attribute verification): 0.95 milliseconds.
      CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal…
      40192552 USN bytes processed.
      Usn Journal verification completed.
      Phase duration (USN journal verification): 2.25 seconds.

      Stage 4: Looking for bad clusters in user file data …
      1145328 files processed.
      File data verification completed.
      Phase duration (User file recovery): 2.82 hours.

      Stage 5: Looking for bad, free clusters …
      153939752 free clusters processed.
      Free space verification is complete.
      Phase duration (Free space recovery): 0.00 milliseconds.

      Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
      No further action is required.

      976189498 KB total disk space.
      358663400 KB in 924109 files.
      480604 KB in 152531 indexes.
      0 KB in bad sectors.
      1286482 KB in use by the system.
      65536 KB occupied by the log file.
      615759012 KB available on disk.

      4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
      244047374 total allocation units on disk.
      153939753 allocation units available on disk.
      Total duration: 2.96 hours (10671129 ms).

      Internal Info:
      00 7a 11 00 a9 6d 10 00 a4 a1 1c 00 00 00 00 00 .z…m……….
      39 03 00 00 a7 64 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 9….d……….

      Windows has finished checking your disk.
      Please wait while your computer restarts.

    • #48622

      dfhjr
      Participant
      @dfhjr

      I accidentally found the solution to my problem here:

      https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/command-prompt-is-missing-on-windows-10/1c9ab178-6fc7-40c7-a9d6-47d43a530c9f

      Somehow the “use powershell” switch had been turned on. I turned it off and the command prompt no longer disappears.

      Thanks to all who offered help.

      don

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